Manufactures

The Foodie Spirit of the Mosel Region

For many people, Mosel is a synonym for fine wine. Quite right, too, but it’s definitely worth discovering the region’s other delicacies made and offered by individual producers.

If you love good wine, then you’re no doubt open to other gourmet treats. The most beautiful wine-growing region for Riesling is therefore the perfect place to stock up on specialities that make your mouth water and that enrich your palate. After all, there are plenty of “made in Mosel” products: vinegars and oils, spices, sweet and fruity treats, game and cheese... all direct from their producers, both in shops and online.

Vinegar?

And how... but delicious!

Essig in Weinflaschen mit orangenem Etikett aufgereiht nebeneinander

Sumptuous enjoyment is often an all-encompassing experience – particularly if you enjoy cooking yourself. And so the Steffens-Keß winery in Reil, that specialises in ecological, steep-slope wines, offers balsamic and wine vinegars made from their high-quality grapes.

As part of a Mosel Heroes project, experienced professional chef Herbert Budweg from Ediger-Eller turns local herbs and vegetables from the surrounding gardens and meadows into fine delicacies, for example vinegar made from typical black walnuts and pesto made from untreated vine leaves or wild garlic mustard.

 

Chutneys, marmalades and vinegars both in small quantities and made from sustainably cultivated, regional ingredients are a passion of the vinegar producer Hoffmann in Winnigen. Long ripening times and the lack of preservatives or flavour enhancers characterise the delicacies like balsamic vinegar with elder, lavender lemon verbena or figs.

In Koblenz, Achim Bertgen has been able to realise his dream of having his own oil mill. The mill creates exceptional oils from organic seeds for fresh, aromatic salads.

 

From aperitif to digestif

Pure enjoyment for every course

What would a delectable Mosel menu be without fresh meat, handmade cheese for dessert, exquisite liqueurs as an aperitif and spirits as a digestif? More than anything else, a liqueur made from vineyard peaches, that thrive in the mild Mosel climate, are the perfect start to your gourmet meal. Several vintners and wine shops have made lots of treats from this very special, local fruit – from high percentage liqueurs to marmalade – it’s always worth asking and rummaging around.

Enjoying meat in the Mosel means it must be locally sourced and fully natural; in other words, with certified Mosel game that lives freely and healthily. Here you can enjoy your main course in good conscience... no mass production and full of character. The Fritzen meat market in Maring-Noviand and the Eiserloh butchers in Longkamp specialise in deer, venison or boar from nearby forests.

Cheese from the Demeterhof Breit cheese makers in Wittlich or from the experienced Mosel affineur Wolfgang Schultz-Balluff, who makes fine cheeses at the Thorsten Melsheimer Vineyard in Reil under the motto “Wine kisses cheese”, will tickle your taste buds for dessert before the menu finishes with a typical local digestif. Pomace, especially from Riesling grapes, is the delicacy of choice here, countless vineyards have their own distillates and offer these to their guests.

Shopping tour for spoiled taste buds

Ansicht auf eine Flasche Ging Rouge von Wajos.
Drei kleine Töpfchen mit Senf in brauner Keramik, Senfkörner und Löffel

You can take many other delicacies home as a souvenir of the Mosel. At the Göbel-Schleyer-Erben vineyard, you will find an exciting world of treats with a variety of things to delight your taste buds: jellies, dips, chutneys, oils and vinegars.

Wajos is also a paradise for foodies; a visit to their shop in Cochem old town will take you on sumptuous, and lengthy journeys of discovery.

Mosel finesse enriches everything – from pasta to gin. A short distance away, the historic Cochem mustard mill entices with is unusual aromas. Mustard comes not just in its classic variant, but also in fascinating, fruity or sweet variants.

Speaking of sweet: hidden in the alleyways of Bernkastel-Kues, the historic Willi Maas sweet makers is a must if, as an adult, you want to realise your sweet-filled dreams of childhood. Some of their sweets have exotic or alcoholic notes.

 

Karamellbonbon mit weißem Papier verpackt wird gestempelt

You’ll be forever licking your lips if you visit Fräulein Diehl in Koblenz’s old town – that’s what Jenny Krause named her caramel factory, where you can find the aromatic confection as a sweet or creme or as an ingredient in Muesli and tea. The exquisite spice world of Pfeffersack and Sons provides a taste contrast just a few streets away.

 

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